Current Federal Funding Landscape

Get updates about the current federal funding landscape, including the state of budget and appropriations and the implications on geoscience.

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Current Landscape

Science Spending Bills Ready for Votes (18 June 2018)

Congress is committing itself to passing a budget on time this year with Senate Majority Leader McConnell going so far as to cancel most of the Senate’s August recess. Right now, though, both houses are on track to meet their goal.

The House and Senate Appropriations Committees both passed versions of the three spending bills that fund NASA, NOAA, NSF, USGS, EPA, and DOE. The entire House approved the DOE funding brought forward by its committee as part of a mini spending bill package. The Senate is scheduled to vote on DOE funding as part of a similarly structured minibus this week. Once bills are approved by their respective chambers, negotiations will begin to hash out differences between the House and Senate versions.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION –$21.3 BILLION OR A 2.8% INCREASE OVER FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $20,736.14 $19,892.20 $21,500.00 3.68% $21,323.40 2.83%
Overall Science $6,221.50 $5,895.00 $6,680.60 7.38% $6,400.30 2.87%
Earth Science $1,921.00 $1,784.20 $1,900.00 -1.09% $1,931.00 0.52%
Planetary Science $2,227.90 $2,234.70 $2,758.50 23.82% $2,201.50 -1.18%
Heliophysics $688.50 $690.70 $688.50 0.00% $720.00 4.58%
James Webb Space Telescope $533.70 $304.60 $304.60 -42.93% $304.60 -42.93%
Education $100.00 $0.00 $90.00 -10.00% $110.00 10.00%

*NASA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

Notable Provisions:

  • While both bills provide a substantial increase for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), the funding is inequitably distributed among NASA’s mission areas.
  • The committee report accompanying the Senate’s bill “commends SMD’s efforts to respond to data challenges by implementing innovative cloud storage agreements, investing in data and information systems, and developing supercomputing capabilities.” NASA is also directed to update Congress on the status of expanding the adoption of cloud computing within the Science Mission Directorate.
  • The Senate’s report specifically provides funding for Earth Science Missions that the Administration sought to terminate, including: PACE, CLARREO Pathfinder, OCO-3, and instruments on Deep Space Climate Observatory. The report also provides funding for the Carbon Monitoring System and for Landsat 9 to ensure a 2020 launch.
  • Language that AGU and other organizations requested regarding the latest Earth Science decadal was included in the Senate report:
    • Earth Science Decadal – The Committee supports the release and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences Earth Science and Applications from Space Decadal Survey report and directs NASA to implement its findings to the extent practicable. As articulated by the report, NASA should seek when appropriate to competitively select future missions that address Designated and Earth System Explorer target observables. The Committee believes an increase in competition will further encourage responsible cost and schedule constraints, develop novel remote sensing technologies, and leverage the talents and expertise of scientists at universities and research institutions.”
  • Both bills appropriate the $218 million the President requested for Lunar Discovery and Exploration, which includes $200 million for the new Lunar Future Initiative.
  • The Senate report encourages NASA “to continue its use of Green Bank Observatory (GBO) to support its Planetary Science Research program.”
  • Senate bill specifically calls for the continuation of WFIRST and provides $352 million for the telescope in keeping with a 2025 launch date, a high decadal priority that was eliminated in the president’s budget. The House bill provides $150 million for WFIRST.
  • Like in the House report, the Senate’s report language also expresses disappoint of the execution and management of JWST and their expectation to be briefed going forward with project updates.
  • The Senate bill changes the name of NASA’s Education office to the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Opportunities account. The new STEM Opportunities program is provided with $110 million; including $10 million for competitive grants for STEM programs at museums, planetariums, NASA Visitors Centers, and other organizations

 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION –$8.1 BILLION OR A 4.3% INCREASE OVER FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $7,767.36 $7,472.00 $8,200 5.57% $8,100.00 4.28%
Research & Related Activities $6,334.48 $6,150.68 $6,651.50 5.00% $6,560.18 3.56%
Education & Human Resources $902 $873.37 $902.00 0.00% $915.00 1.44%
Major Research Equipment & Facilities $182.80 $94.65 $268.04 46.63% $249.25 36.35%
National Science Board $4.37 $4.32 $4.37 0.00% $4.37 0.00%
Office of Inspector General $15.20 $15.35 $15.35 0.99% $15.35 0.99%
Agency Operations and Award Management $328.51 $333.63 $333.63 1.56% $328.51 0.00%

*NSF budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

Notable Provisions:

  • The Senate’s committee report accompanying the bill specifically outlines that funding for NSF’s “10 Big Ideas” should not come at the expense of funding for core research.
  • The Senate bill provides a 3.56% increase (compared with the House’s 5% increase) for the Research and Related Activities account, which includes funding for the Geosciences directorate (GEO).
  • Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) receives $176.65 million.
  • The Senate Committee encourages NSF to transfer USArray Monitor stations, that NSF planned to remove in 2019 to the USGS.
  • The Senate report also directs NSF to request adequate budgetary resources for the 2020 VORTEX-SE tornado research campaign.
  • In response to the planned 2020 de-commission of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, the Senate report directs NSF to brief Congress on future plans for marine seismic research, including maintaining access to world class research tools.
  • Mirroring the House committee report, the Senate report specifies funding for 3 Regional Class Research Vessels.
  • Finally, Agency Operation and Award Management receives $5 million less than the Administration’s request.

 

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION –$5.5 BILLION OR A 6% DECREASE FROM FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $5,827.00 $4,560.76 $5,159.00 -11.46% $5,480.00 -5.96%
National Ocean Service (NOS) $565.09 $382.00 $557.58 -1.33% $587.80 4.02%
National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) $882.96 $810.00 $875.26 -0.87% $924.89 4.75%
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) $548.52 $322.00 $503.34 -8.24% $549.26 0.13%
National Weather Service (NWS) $1,157.10 $1,053.00 $1,143.00 -1.22% $1,161.38 0.37%
NESDIS $2,100.57 $1,640.00 $1,661.71 -20.89% $1,743.20 -17.01%
Mission Support $289.54 $245.00 $275.63 -4.80% $300.26 3.70%
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations $457.74 $304.00 $249.25 -45.55% $327.30 -28.50%

*NOAA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

  • NOAA received $5.48 billion in FY2019 in the Senate CJS bill. This is a cut of 6% or $347 million. Although the bill provides 20% more funding than the PBR, NOAA saw large cuts in its Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction (PAC) accounts. PAC is responsible for acquiring and improving capital assets, which are mission-critical to all agency programs and contribute significantly to achieving each of NOAA’s Strategic Goals.
  • The National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) received the largest funding increase, with a 5% increase, followed closely by the National Ocean service, with a 4% increase.
  • Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) received flat funding in the bill, which restores much of the cuts that the President Request outlined. The Senate provided 71% more funding to OAR over the PBR. Additionally of note, the OAR Climate Research Program actually received a 1% increase in funding, which has historically been flat funded.
  • The largest cuts in the bill were aimed at NESDIS, NOAA’s Satellite line office. NESDIS received a 17% cut, which most funds being cut from the NESDIS PAC account (-19%).

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY –$35 BILLION OR A 1.7% INCREASE OVER FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $34,520.05 $30,533.00 $35,494.25 2.82% $34,990.02 1.36%
Office of Science $6,259.90 $5,413.00 $6,600.00 5.43% $6,650.00 6.23%
ARPA-E $353.31 $0.00 $325.00 -8.01% $375.00 6.14%
Bio & Envt Research (BER) $673.00 $500.00 $673.00 0.00% $715.00 6.24%
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) $2,321.78 $696.00 $2,078.64 -10.47% $2,322.00 0.01%
Basic Energy Science $1,744.90 $1,850.00 $1,759.93 0.86% $2,193.40 25.70%

*DOE budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

  • Most programs within the Office of Science saw flat funding or increases. Both the House and Senate increased the overall funding levels for DOE.
  • The House bill specifically addresses concerns that the Administration will slow down funding by directing the DOE to “disburse funds appropriated for ARPA-E on eligible projects within a reasonable time period, consistent with past practices.” The Senate bill contains similar language rejecting the cuts and prohibits the agency from using any of the funds to terminate the agency.
  • The Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) is a priority for the Administration. Both chambers concurred with the Administration’s proposal by increasing funding for the program. The House bill proposes over $666 million, an increase of over $23 million compared to the President’s budget request (PBR), and the Senate bill would allocate $980 million.
  • While the House rejected the elimination of ARPA-E, their bill would decrease funding for the program by 8% from FY 2018 omnibus levels. However, the Senate bill would increase funding to $375 million.
  • House appropriators cut the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) line office by over 10%, a proposal not reflected in the Senate bill.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY –$8.1 BILLION OR FLAT FNDING FROM FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

Program FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $8,058.49 $6,191.89 $7,958.00 -1.25% $8,058.49 0.00%
Science and Technology $713.82 $448.97 $643.76 -9.81% $706.47 -1.03%
Environmental Programs and Management $2,643.30 $1,784.85 $2,473.28 -6.43% $2,598.00 -1.71%

*EPA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

  • EPA received flat funding compared to the FY2018 omnibus levels, providing more money than the House proposal and rejecting the drastic cuts in the President’s budget request (PBR). While it’s encouraging to see the Senate reject the drastic cuts outlined in the PBR, this level of funding does not keep pace with inflation or the needs of the agency to fulfill its mission.
  • Particularly, most programs under Science and Technology, which largely funds research at EPA, including the Atmospheric Protection Program, Air and energy research, and chemical safety research, would be cut under the House proposal compared to the FY2018 enacted levels.
  • The Senate bill explicitly limits the agency’s ability to use funds to reduce workforce and reorganize the agency.
  • The Senate bill also included language directing EPA, along with the Forest Service and the Department of Interior, to report to Congress about “agency actions to address harassment of employees, including plans to improve monitoring, training and enforcement, and implement policies that prevent retaliation.”
  • The House bill has similar language directing the Department of Interior and EPA to “take the necessary steps to create and maintain harassment-free workplaces.”

 

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY –$1.1 BILLION OR FLAT T FUNDING FROM FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY18 Omnibus President’s FY19 Budget Request House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%) Senate FY 19 Spending Bill FY19 Senate Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $1,148.46 $859.68 $1,167.29 1.64% $1,148.00 -0.04%
Ecosystems $157.73 $96.13 $157.75 0.01% $158.23 0.32%
Land Resources (formerly Climate and Land Use Change) $152.50 $103.24 $158.30 3.80% $158.30 3.80%
Energy, Minerals, & Environmental Health $102.84 $84.11 $106.90 3.95% $113.64 10.50%
Natural Hazards $178.61 $117.30 $170.11 -4.76% $157.25 11.96%
Water Resources $217.55 $164.92 $231.12 6.24% $220.05 1.15%
Core Science Systems $116.30 $92.28 $119.10 2.41% $118.06 1.51%
Admin & Enterprise Information (Science Support) $102.83 $89.25 $103.63 0.78% $102.83 0.00%
Facilities $120.09 $112.45 $120.38 0.24% $120.09 0.00%

*USGS budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

  • The Senate Interior and Environment Appropriations bill provided the USGS with $1.15 billion in FY19, which is flat funding over the FY18 omnibus. In comparison to the President’s FY19 request, the bill provides 34% more funding for FY19.
  • The Natural Hazards mission area received the largest cut, with a decrease in $21 million, or 12%. Despite this cut, the bill outlines support for much of the work done in Natural Hazards, including the purchase of NSF temporary seismometer deployments that were originally used for the EarthScope USArray project. The committee provides $1.4 million for the purchase of the stations. The largest cuts within Natural Hazards were to Volcano Hazards, with a decrease of $12 million over FY18.
  • The mission area with the greatest increase in funding is the Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health mission, with an increase of $11 million, or 11% over FY 18 levels. The report language supports Executive Order 13817, which aims to improve topographic, geological and geophysical mapping and the bill provides $7 million for the new critical minerals initiative.
  • The remaining offices received between flat funding and 4% increases over FY18.

 

FY2019 Science Spending Bills Kick Off in the House (17 May 2018)

The House Appropriations Committee got the ball rolling for the FY2019 appropriations season with the passage of several spending bills in the first half of May, including the bill that funds NASA, NOAA, and NSF. The House Commerce, Justice, Science bill continues to grow funding for NASA and NSF over FY2018 levels, but NOAA funding levels take a hit.

Spending bills that fund the USGS, DOE, and EPA will be voted on soon in House Appropriations Committee. Meanwhile, the Senate Appropriations Committee released its ambitious schedule to consider all spending bills by the 4 July 2018 recess.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION – $21.5 BILLION OR A 3.7% INCREASE OVER FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

Program FY18 Omnibus House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $20,736.14 $21,500.00 3.68%
Overall Science $6,221.50 $6,680.60 7.38%
Earth Science $1,921.00 $1,900.00 -1.09%
Planetary Science $2,227.90 $2,758.50 23.82%
Heliophysics $688.50 $688.50 0.00%
James Webb Space Telescope $533.70 $304.60 -42.93%
Education $100 $90.00 -10.00%

*NASA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

Notable Provisions:

  • Although the bill provides a substantial increase for the Science Mission Directorate, the funding is inequitably distributed among NASA’s mission areas.
  • The committee report accompanying the bill directs NASA to submit “realistic outyear budgets that show the level of investment required in future years to accomplish the variety of NASA missions and refrain from submitting budgets that are not executable in a timely fashion.”
  • Despite the cut to Earth Science, language that AGU and other organizations requested regarding the latest Earth Science decadal was included in the report:
    • Earth Science Decadal – The Committee supports the release and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences Earth Science and Applications from Space Decadal Survey report and directs NASA to implement its findings to the extent practicable. As articulated by the report, NASA should seek when appropriate to competitively select future missions that address Designated and Earth System Explorer target observables. The Committee believes an increase in competition will further encourage responsible cost and schedule constraints, develop novel remote sensing technologies, and leverage the talents and expertise of scientists at universities and research institutions.”
  • The bill appropriates the $218 million the President requested for Lunar Discovery and Exploration, which includes $200 million for the new Lunar Future Initiative.
  • In keeping with Chairman Culberson’s robust support for Europa, the bill provides $760.9 million for Outer Planets and Ocean Worlds and outlines a timeline for the Europa mission: a Europa Clipper launch no later than 2022 and a Europa lander launch no later than 2024.
  • Bill specifically calls for the continuation of WFIRST and provides $150 million for the telescope, a high decadal priority that was eliminated in the president’s budget.
  • The report language strongly admonishes NASA and, in the latter case, private sector partners for the budget creep and issues that have arisen with WFIRST and JWST.
  • The Bill also provides $90 million for the NASA Education office, ensuring funding for the popular Space Grant program as well as the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP).

 NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION – $8.2 BILLION OR A 5.0% INCREASE OVER FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

Program FY18 Omnibus House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $7,767.36 $8,200.00 5.57%
Research & Related Activities $6,334.48 $6,651.50 5.00%
Education & Human Resources $902.00 $902.00 0.00%
Major Research Equipment & Facilities $182.80 $268.04.80 46.63%
National Science Board $4.37 $4.37 0.00%
Office of Inspector General $15.20 $15.35 0.99%
Agency Operations & Award Management $328.51 $333.63 1.56%

*NSF budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

Notable Provisions:

  • The committee report accompanying the bill specifically references the importance of the Earth and space sciences: “The Committee underscores the importance of basic research that both improves the lives of Americans and expands our understanding of the Earth, the depths of our oceans, our Solar System, the Universe, and oceans on other planets.”
  • The bill provides a 5% increase for the Research and Related Activities account, which includes funding for the Geosciences directorate (GEO).
  • The report also specifically supports the Antarctic Infrastructure Modernization for Science program and the More and Better Science in Antarctica through Increased Logistical Effectiveness report, ocean exploration, and provides $48,000,00 for the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP).
  • Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) receives $170.69 million.
  • The report also reiterates provisions in the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act, which call for NSF proposals to address how the project fulfills NSF’s mission and direct NSF to administer the broader impacts criteria proscribed by the law.
  • The report specifies funding for 3 Regional Class Research Vessels as well as $1 million for enhanced oversight of NSF’s Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction account.
  • Finally, Agency Operation and Award Management receives an additional $5 million as well as direction to “address data security concerns, including intellectual property in NSF-funded research projects or at NSF-funded facilities.”

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION – $5.2 BILLION OR AN 11.5% DECREASE FROM FY2018 FUNDING LEVELS

Program FY18 Omnibus House FY19 Spending Bill FY19 House Bill vs FY18 Omnibus (%)
Overall $5,827.00 $5,159.00 -11.46%
National Ocean Service (NOS) $565.09 $557.58 -1.33%
National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) $882.96 $875.26 -0.87%
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) $548.52 $503.34 -8.24%
National Weather Service (NWS) $1,157.10 $1,143.00 -1.22%
NESDIS $2,100.57 $1,661.71 -20.89%
Mission Support $289.54 $275.63 -4.80%
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations $457.74 $249.25 -45.55%

*NOAA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest ten thousand

Notable Provisions:

  • The House CJS bill allocates $5.2 billion for NOAA in FY2019, which is an 11% decrease from FY2018 levels but a 47% restoration from the president’s budget request (PBR), which was $4.65 billion. The bill also restored quite a bit to the National Ocean Service (46% from PBR), although the total is still a 1% cut from the FY2018 omnibus.
  • The largest cuts in the bill are in the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (-8%), and Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (-46%).
  • Within OAR, Climate Research received a large cut (-38%), and the bill includes the elimination of NOAA’s climate competitive research program as well as the Regional Coastal Resiliency Fund, which enhances our coastal resilience through competitively-awarded grants that help communities withstand extreme weather and related hazards.
  • The National Weather Service was supported in the House bill, with a 1% cut that could be attributed to projects being completed. The bill also includes language calling on the NWS to “continue to hire in fiscal year 2019, and to have additional FTEs on board by the end of the fiscal year.”
  • NOAA satellite are supported in the FY19 CJS bill. Although NESDIS received a 21% cut, that is largely because JPSS and the GOES-R programs have both passed their funding peaks.  The bill includes “full funding” for the Joint Polar Satellite System and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite programs, which are developing NOAA next-generation weather satellites.
  • The committee did not agree with the administration’s proposal to merge the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Polar Follow On (PFO) accounts.  The total amount for the two programs remains the same ($878 million), but is split into $572 million for JPSS and $306 million for PFO.  The report does not explain the decision, but commends NOAA on the launch of JPSS-1 and “expects NOAA to incorporate lessons learned from JPSS-1 into the planning and execution of the remaining JPSS satellites.”

 

FY 2018 – Funding is a Go! (23 March 2018)

After seven months and five continuing resolutions (a “CR” is a short term spending bill that maintains funding at previous fiscal year levels), Congress at last passed a spending bill for fiscal year (FY) 2018 early in the morning on 23 March 2018. President Trump signed the $1.3 trillion spending bill into law later that afternoon. Now, federal agencies will be out of funding limbo through 30 September 2018.

With the protracted FY2018 process behind them, members of Congress can turn their full attention to developing and negotiating federal spending for FY2019. The President already released his budget request for FY2019 on 12 February 2018. Read more about the FY 2018 omnibus and appropriations process here.

 

President Releases FY 2019 Budget Request (12 February 2018)

This has been an interesting year for the budget and appropriations process. We are currently in fiscal year (FY) 2018 under a continuing resolution (CR, short term spending bill that maintains funding at previous FY levels). While Congress is still negotiating the FY2018 spending bills, the President has released his FY2019 budget request. Congress needs to finish the FY2018 process and pass a FY2019 spending bill before the new fiscal year starts on 1 October 2018.

As we have more information, we will be updating you all here. In the meantime, get the highlights about the President’s budget request here.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration – $19.9 billion or a 1.22% over FY2017 Funding Levels

FY2017

President’s Budget Request for FY2018

FY19 President’s Budget Request

Overall

$19,653.30

$19,052.90

$19,892.20

Overall Science

$5,765.90

$5,711.80

$5,895.00

Earth Science

$1,921.00

$1,754.10

$1,784.20

Planetary Science

$1,846.00

$1,929.50

$2,234.70

Heliophysics

$678.50

$677.80

$690.70

James Webb Space Telescope

$569.40

$533.70

$304.60

Education

$100

$37.30

$0.00

*NASA budget in millions, rounded to the nearest thousand

Notable Provisions:

The President’s request once again proposes terminating five Earth science missions, including PACE, OCO-3, CLARREO Pathfinder, DSCOVR Earth observing instruments, and RBI. NASA canceled RBI in January 2018 due to cost and schedule overruns. Overall, Earth science would see a seven percent decrease in funding.

The President’s request also cancels WFIRST due to its significant cost and other priorities within the mission.

The budget also terminates the Office of Education, including: Space Grant, MUREP, and EPSCoR.

Within Heliophysics, the request includes a $3 million increase for collaborating with other agences on space weather capabilities. Overall, Heliophysics would see a 1.8% increase in funding.

The President’s request establishes a Planetary Defense program, including the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) and Near-Earth Objective Observations. Within Planetary sicence, the budget also creates a robotic Lunar Discovery and Exploration program to support commercial partnerships in achiving exploration goals. All of this will be supported by a 21% increase in funding for planetary science.

More information about the President’s budget request for NASA can be found here.

National Science Foundation – $7.5 Billion or Flat Funding from  FY2017 Funding Levels

FY2017 President’s Budget Request for FY2018 President’s Budget Request for FY2019
Overall $7,472.22 $6,652.89 $7,472.00
Research & Related Activities $6,033.65 $5,361.65 $6,151.00
Education & Human Resources $880.00 $760.55 $873.00
Major Research Equipment & Facilities $209.00 $182.80 $95.00
National Science Board $4.37 $4.37 $4.00
Office of Inspector General $15.20 $15.01 $15.00
Agency Operations and Award Management $330.00 $328.51 $334.00

*NSF budget in millions of dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand

Notable Provisions:

The increase for the Research & Related Activities account will allow NSF to invest in priority areas like Advancing NSF’s Big Ideas and beginning construction on the Antarctic Infrastructure Modernization for Science project.

The decrease for the Major Research Equipment & Facilities Construction account is largely due to the support for two new Regional Class Research Vessels.

The decrease for the Agency Operations and Award Management account is largely due to the completion of the construction of and relocation to NSF’s new headquarters building.

More details about the FY2019 NSF budget are available here.

National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration – $4.6 MILLION OR A 20% DECREASE FROM FY2017 FUNDING LEVELS

FY2017 President’s Budget Request for FY2018 President’s Budget Request for FY2019
Overall $5,675.00 $4,775.30 $4,560.76
National Ocean Service (NOS) $521.10 $387.00 $382.00
National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) $851.54 $821.00 $810.00
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) $514.13 $350.00 $322.00
National Weather Service (NWS) $1,121.57 $1,059.00 $1,053.00
NESDIS $2,203.60 $1,816.00 $1,640.00
Mission Support $261.47 $234.00 $245.00
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations $297.93 $300.68 $304.00

 

Notable Provisions

The President’s budget proposal cuts NOAA overall by 20%, a total decrease of $1.1 million. This cut is 4.5% larger than what was proposed for FY18.  Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), which supports the majority of NOAA research, received the largest cut, 37%. In a similar fashion to last year, the budget request targeted climate research, and proposed cutting 38% of funding from the Climate Research Program within OAR.

The budget decreases funding for both atmospheric and oceanic research within OAR. The proposal terminates Artic research, which focuses on improvements to sea ice modeling and predictions that support fishermen, commercial shippers, cruise ships, and local communities. The budget also terminates modeling of ecosystem and fisheries vulnerabilities and reduces funding for Cooperative Institutes, universities, NOAA laboratories, and other partners that advance understanding of the Earth’s climate system. Additionally, the budget terminates Vortex-Southeast, a program used to detect, respond to, and warn against tornadoes in the Southeastern United States. As was the case last year, the proposal terminates federal support for the network of 33 Sea Grant programs located in coastal States and territories.

The President’s budget requests a 27% cut to the National Ocean Service. This includes termination of $9 million in competitive research grants for ecological research, a decrease of $84 million to terminate the Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Grants Program and the Regional Coastal Resilience Grants Program, and a reduction of $23 million to terminate Federal funding support to states for the management of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System.

Although NOAA satellites are cut by 26% in the budget, it does include positive language about NOAA’s Polar Orbiting Satellites and includes funding increases for on-orbit support for the DSCOVR satellite and the Jason-3 Satellite. The budget also provides a slight funding boost to the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations.

For more information about the President’s Budget Request for NOAA, see the FY19 Blue Book.

 

Department of Energy – $6.1 BILLION OR 25% DECREASE FROM FY2017 FUNDING LEVELS

  FY2017 President’s Budget Request for FY2018 President’s Budget Request for FY2019
Overall $30,786.01 $28,042.00 $30,609
Office of Science $5,392.00 $4,472.52 $5,391
ARPA-E $306.00 $20.00 $0

*DOE budget in millions of dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand

Notable Provisions:

The President’s request proposes over $30.6 billion for the Department of Energy (DOE) – a less than 1% decrease from FY2017 funding levels and significantly higher than the President’s FY2018 budget request. The President’s supplemental request reduced the proposed cuts under his plan by adding another $1.5 billion to the agency’s proposed topline number.

Despite this supplemental boost and the relatively flat top line numbers, several programs under DOE would receive significant cuts under this proposal. For example, funding for the Advanced Research Project Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) is zeroed out under the President’s budget; an elimination which was proposed in the President’s FY2018 budget and faced push back from both Democrats and Republicans.

Overall, the Office of Science would see flat funding compared to current funding levels— a 20% increase over the President’s FY2018 budget request. However, all programs under the Office would see cuts, except the Advanced Scientific Computing Research program – which received a 39% increase – and the Safeguards and Security program.

For more, see the DOE budget highlights and full budget request here.

Environmental Protection Agency – $6.1 BILLION OR 25% DECREASE FROM FY2017 FUNDING LEVELS

Program FY2017 President’s Budget Request for FY2018 President’s Budget Request for FY2019
Overall $8,058.49 $5,700.00 $6,124.00
Science and Technology $713.82 $397.00 $424.00
Environmental Programs and Management $2,619.80 $1,617.00 $1,689.00

*EPA budget in millions of dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand

Notable Provisions:

The President’s request proposes roughly $6.1 billion dollars for EPA – nearly 25% lower than its FY2017 funding levels, but higher than his previous budget request. This increase is a result of the addendum that the President released in response to the new budget. The supplemental request reduced the proposed cuts under the President’s plan by adding another $725 million to the agency’s proposed topline number.

The President’s budget proposes the elimination of several pages worth of EPA programs, particularly climate-related programs. Language in the budget justify the elimination and/or reduction of programs by stating that the proposal will “refocus EPA on its core mission” and “eliminate funding for lower priority programs”. According to the proposal, statutory requirements associated with these programs will be absorbed by other programs.

Some programs slated for elimination under the President’s plan include the Climate Change Research and Partnership Programs, Regional Science and Technology Programs, STAR research grants, Global Change Research Program and the Environmental Education Program.

Despite tauting the important work conducted at EPA and its significant role in delivering “vital data on the potential risks and hazards to first responders and the public”, if enacted, the President’s proposal would be the lowest funding level in recent memory and would result in a reduction in the EPA workforce by over 3,000.

For more, see the EPA budget highlights and full budget request here.

United States Geological Survey – $860 MILLION OR 21% DECREASE FROM FY2017 FUNDING LEVELS

FY2017 President’s Budget Request for FY2018 President’s Budget Request for FY2019
Overall $1,085.12 $922.17 $859.68
Ecosystems $159.73 $132.13 $96.13
Climate & Land Use Change $149.28 $112.85 $103.24
Energy, Minerals, & Environmental Health $94.31 $91.51 $84.11
Natural Hazards $145.01 $118.11 $117.30
Water Resources $214.75 $173.04 $164.92
Core Science Systems $116.05 $92.97 $92.28
Admin & Enterprise Information (Science Support) $105.61 $89.37 $89.25
Facilities $100.42 $112.19 $112.45

 

*USGS budget in millions of dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand

Notable Provisions:

The President’s request proposes a 21% cut to USGS for FY2019, with a topline budget of $860 million. This is a 7% larger cut to the agency over last year’s proposal. The Ecosystems mission area received the largest cut, with a proposed 40% cut in funding from FY17 omnibus levels. The second largest proposed cut is to the Climate and Land Use Change mission area, which the President proposed reorganizing to create three new Land Resources subactivities.

President Trump also proposed eliminating the Environmental Health program within the Energy, Minerals, and Environmental health mission area. The Environmental Health program provides information about contaminants and pathogens in the environment to agricultural, natural resources, and public health officials, and the program supports 119 employees. The budget justification states that this cut was made “to address higher priorities”. In addition to zeroing out funding for the program, the budget seeks to increase funding for Energy and Minerals by 15%. President Trump seeks to support Executive Order 13817 and Secretarial Order 3359 which focus on strengthening the nation’s critical mineral resources and development.

The President’s budget also seeks to cut funds for hazards research programs. The budget cuts approximately $13 million from the Earthquake Hazards program and cuts about $1.7 million to operate the Global Seismic Network, which plays a critical role in monitoring earthquakes around the nation and supporting research. Additionally the proposal seeks to suspend implementation of the Volcano Early Warning System and the ShakeAlert warning system.

Similarly to last year’s budget request, the President continues to support the 2021 launch of Landsat 9, proposing $14 million for ground systems development.

For more information, see the USGS budget in brief document here, and the budget justification document here.


The Administration’s proposed budget is not only detrimental to decades of scientific research and progress but will also negatively impact the safety, security, health, and economic well-being of citizens around the globe, including millions within the United States.  Read AGU’s response to the President’s Budget here.


 

Actions You Can Take:

  • Visit AGU’s Policy Action Center to write your members of Congress about the critical importance of science agencies to progress, innovation, and serving the basic needs of the American public.
  • Schedule  setting up meetings with your members of Congress
  • Share the value of your science on our everyday lives with your community or share your story with us.

Past fiscal years:

FY2018

FY2017

FY2016

FY2015